Processes of Native Nationhood: The Indigenous Politics of Self-Government

Sept. 15, 2015
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Processes of Native Nationhood- The Indigenous Politics of Self-Government

Over the last three decades, Indigenous peoples in the CANZUS countries (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States) have been reclaiming self-government as an Indigenous right and practice. In the process, they have been asserting various forms of Indigenous nationhood. This article argues that this development involves a common set of activities on the part of Indigenous peoples: (1) identifying as a nation or a people (determining who the appropriate collective “self” is in self-determination and self-government); (2) organizing as a political body (not just as a corporate holder of assets); and (3) acting on behalf of Indigenous goals (asserting and exercising practical decision-making power and responsibility, even in cases where central governments deny recognition).

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Citation

Cornell, Stephen. 2015. "Processes of Native Nationhood: The Indigenous Politics of Self-Government." The International Indigenous Policy Journal 6 (4). doi: 10.18584/iipj.2015.6.4.4.

Contacts
Stephen Cornell