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M.Jorgensen

Miriam Jorgensen, M.P.P., Ph.D.
Director of Research for the Native Nations Institute,
Research Professor in the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, and Research Director, Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development

Curriculum Vitae (pdf)
News items (link)

Address: 803 E. First St., Tucson, AZ 85719
Phone: 520-626-0664
E-mail: mjorgens@u.arizona.edu


Biographical Note

Miriam Jorgensen is Research Director for the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy (NNI) at The University of Arizona and Research Director for the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, Harvard University. During the past fifteen years, she has worked primarily on issues of governance and economic development in Indian Country, with a particular concentration on the ways individual Native nations' social and cultural characteristics affect development.

Jorgensen has studied and written about a variety of related public policy topics, including welfare reform, Native constitutional reform, tribal policing and justice systems, Indian housing, and tribal gaming and forestry enterprises. Increasingly, this work also has addressed the problems and concerns of First Nations in Canada.

Jorgensen has been a visiting scholar at the Washington University School of Law and the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, has served as an instructor in economics at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Harvard School of Public Health, and is a former member of the Swarthmore College Board of Managers. She received her B.A. in economics from Swarthmore College (1987), B.A. and M.A. in human sciences from the University of Oxford (1989, 1995), M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (1991), and Ph.D. from Harvard University (2000).


Publications

ARTS AND CULTURE

Leadership Development in the Native American Arts & Culture Sector

Jorgensen, Miriam, and Rachel Starks. 2008. A report commissioned by the Ford Foundation. New York: Ford Foundation. [pdf]

Subsumed in the 2010 Ford Foundation report, Native Arts and Cultures: Research, Growth, and Opportunities for Philanthropic Support (see "Supporting a Burgeoning Revival of Native Arts: Leaders Wanted," pp. 16-27). [pdf]

Reviews ways that the Native arts sector might cultivate and sustain leaders.

 

Native Cultural Arts Organizations: What They Are and What They Need

Jorgensen, Miriam, and others. 2005. Tucson and Phoenix: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Atlatl, Inc. [pdf]

Offers an analytical summary of results form a national survey of Native-controlled cultural arts organizations to gain a better understanding of the entities comprised in the sector and their needs.


ASSET BUILDING AND ASSET POLICY
Per Capita Distributions of American Indian Tribal Revenues: A Preliminary Discussion of Policy Considerations

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, Stephanie C. Rainie, Ian Record, Ryan Seelau, and Rachel R. Starks. 2009 (in press). Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.
 
Borrowing Trouble: Predatory Lending in Native American Communities

First Nations Development Institute (Miriam Jorgensen, lead author). 2008. Washington, DC: First Nations Development Institute. [link]

Analyzes the extent of predatory lending activity in Indian Country with regard to housing lending, payday lending, car title loans, loans against tax refunds, and pawn shop activity; provides recommendations on how Native nations might limit the activities of predatory lenders in their communities, including assisting borrowers who are already engaged with such lenders, educating consumers on how to avoid predatory lenders, and shutting down predatory lending through regulation and legislation.
 
Deepening Our Understanding of the Financial Education of Native Youth: An In-Depth Look at Native Students in Montana, New Mexico, and South Dakota

Anderson, William, Miriam Jorgensen, Noorie Brantmeier, and Lewis Mandell. 2008. Rapid City and Washington, DC: First Nations Oweesta Corporation and Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy. [link]

Provides an in-depth look, using the Jump$tart survey instrument, at the personal financial knowledge of Native youth in three states with high Native populations—Montana, New Mexico, and South Dakota; examines the largest sample of Native high school students ever surveyed regarding financial literacy skills.

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.
 

The Financial Literacy of Native American Youth

Jorgensen, Miriam, and Lewis Mandell. 2007. Rapid City: National Financial Education Coalition, First Nations Oweesta Corporation. [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 

Contributions of the Earned Income Tax Credit to Community Development in Indian Country

Wagner, Kristen, Miriam Jorgensen, Dana Klar, and Karen Edwards. 2006. Report to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2005 Native Community VITA Site Project. St. Louis: Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies and Center for Social Development, Washington University. [link]

 
Large Foundations’ Grantmaking to Native America

Hicks, Sarah, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2005. Cambridge: Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Summarizes the findings of a study of the amounts, sources, and targets of large private foundations’ investments in Native America.

For a detailed version of this study see: Hicks, Sarah, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2005. Philanthropy in Indian Country: Who Is Giving? Who Is Receiving? St. Louis and Cambridge: Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies, Washington University, and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, Harvard University. [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
The State of the Native Nations: Conditions under U.S. Policies of Self-Determination

Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development (Eric Henson, Jonathan B. Taylor, Catherine Curtis, Stephen Cornell, Kenneth Grant, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph P. Kalt and Andrew Lee). 2007. New York: Oxford University Press. [link]
 
Native Nations and Arizona's Economy

Cornell, Stephen, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2010. In Building Arizona's Future: Jobs, Innovation and Competitiveness, ed. Vera Pavlakovich-Kochi and Jen E. McCormack, 119-123. Background report for the 96th Arizona Town Hall, held April 25-28, 2010, Tucson, Arizona 2010. Tucson: The University of Arizona.Tucson. [link]
 
Is There Only One Path to Development? Sustainable Heterogeneity among Contemporary American Indian Nations

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, and Joseph P. Kalt. 2009 (in press). Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.
 

The Nature and Components of Economic Development in Indian Country

Cornell, Stephen, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2007. Prepared for the National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. [pdf]

Defines what economic development means and how it applies in Indian Country; looks at the changing patterns of Indian Country economic development; debunks some of the myths and misconceptions about economic development in Native nations; suggests policy options for both Indigenous nations and the federal government; and calls for better ways to measure socioeconomic change in Indigenous communities.

 

Statement before the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Oversight Hearing on Economic Development

Jorgensen, Miriam. 2006. In Oversight Hearing on Economic Development in Indian Country, before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, 109th Congress, Second Session, May 10, 2006, 75-95. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. [link]

Provides a 20-page review about economic development, the elements to successful economic development in Indian Country, and the implications for federal policy-making.

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 

History's Lesson for HUD and Tribes

Jorgensen, Miriam. 2004. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Analyzes the differential success of the Indian Housing Authority and provides important information about the conditions under which the new tribal efforts will be successful; finds that unless the new approach addresses core issues of tribal governance, it will be inadequate for real reform of Indian housing.

 

Welfare, Work, and American Indians: The Impact of Welfare Reform

Brown, Eddie F., Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, and others. 2001. A report to the National Congress of American Indians. St. Louis and Tucson: Kathryn Buder Center for American Indian Studies, Washington University, and Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy, The University of Arizona. [pdf]

Reviews key features of the welfare reform legislation as it applies to American Indians and Indian Country, assesses the impact on Indian nations, and identifies key issues that demand attention.

 

What determines Indian economic success? Evidence from tribal and individual Indian enterprises

Jorgensen, Miriam, and Jonathan Taylor. 2000. Red Ink 8(2): 45-51. [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.


GOVERNANCE

Rebuilding Native Nations: Strategies for Governance and Development

Jorgensen, Miriam, ed. 2007. Foreword by Oren Lyons. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. [link]

Provides guidelines for creating new governance structures, rewriting constitutions, building justice systems, launching nation-owned enterprises, encouraging citizen entrepreneurs, developing new relationships with non-Native governments, and confronting the crippling legacies of colonialism.

 

Divorce and real property on American Indian reservations: Lessons for First Nations and Canada

Flies-Away, Joseph Thomas, Carrie Garrow, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2005 Atlantis: A Women's Studies Journal/Revue d'etudes sur les femmes 29(2): 81-92. English [pdf] | French [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 

American Indian tribes’ financial accountability to the U.S. government: A report to the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Curtis, Catherine, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2004. In Aboriginal Policy Research: Setting the Agenda for Change (Vol. 2), ed. Jerry P. White, Paul Maxim, and Dan Beavon, 17-34. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing). book [link] or report [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 

The Concept of Governance and its Implications for First Nations

Cornell, Stephen, Catherine Curtis, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2004. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Describes the critical role both governance and government play in human communities; examines what effective self-governance involves and how self-governing systems can be built, and draws distinctions between self-administration—sometimes mistaken for self-government—and genuine self-government.

 
History's Lesson for HUD and Tribes

Jorgensen, Miriam. 2004. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Analyzes the differential success of the Indian Housing Authority and provides important information about the conditions under which the new tribal efforts will be successful; finds that unless the new approach addresses core issues of tribal governance, it will be inadequate for real reform of Indian housing.
 

First Nations Governance Act: Implications of Research Findings from the United States and Canada

Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, and Joseph P. Kalt. 2002. A report to the Office of the British Columbia Regional Vice-Chief Assembly of First Nations. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy, The University of Arizona. [pdf]

 

Nebraska Sioux Lean Beef (Part A & Part B)

Jorgensen, Miriam. 1990. Case Study. Cambridge: Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. Part A [pdf] Part B [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 
HEALTH

Review of the First Nations Regional Longitudinal Health Survey (RHS) 2002/03

Adams, Alyce, Courtney Andrews, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2006. Cambridge: Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 
LAW AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Strengthening and Rebuilding Tribal Justice Systems: A Participatory Outcomes Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Justice Comprehensive Indian Resources for Community and Law Enforcement (CIRCLE) Project

Wakeling, Stewart, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2007. Final report to the U.S. Department of Justice. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. [pdf]

Assesses the U.S. Department of Justice’s Comprehensive Indian Resources for Community and Law Enforcement (CIRCLE) Project, which aimed to help participating tribes implement strategies for making the individual components of their justice systems work better together in addressing crime and related social problems.

 
Divorce and real property on American Indian reservations: Lessons for First Nations and Canada

Flies-Away, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph Thomas and Carrie Garrow. 2005 Atlantis: A Women's Studies Journal/Revue d'etudes sur les femmes 29(2): 81-92. English [pdf] | French [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.
 

Policing on American Indian Reservations

Wakeling, Stewart, Susan Michaelson and Manley Begay. 2001. A report to the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, United States Department of Justice. [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 

Improving Safety in Indian Country: Recommendations from the IACP 2001 Summit

International Association of Chiefs of Police (Miriam Jorgensen, author). 2001. Arlington, VA: International Association of Chiefs of Police. [pdf]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.

 
LEADERSHIP

Seizing the Future: Why Some Native Nations Do and Others Don't

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph P. Kalt, and Katherine A. Spilde. 2005. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. [pdf]

Examines the question of why is it that some Native nations seize upon the nation building strategy and take effective control of their futures while others do not; finds that foundational change in a community arises when the external and internal conditions a people face interact with their interpretations of their situation, producing a new, shared “story” of what is possible, and how it can be achieved.

CITE AS:
Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph P. Kalt, and Katherine A. Spilde. 2007. Seizing the future: Why some native nations do and others don't. In Rebuilding Native Nations: Strategies for Governance and Development, ed. Miriam Jorgensen, . Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

 
METHODS
Indigenizing evaluation research: How Lakota methodologies are helping “raise the tipi” in the Oglala Sioux Nation

Robertson, Paul, Miriam Jorgensen, and Carrie Garrow. 2004. American Indian Quarterly 28(3): 134-63. [link]

The research for this report was conducted under the auspices of NNI's partner organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University.
 
Native Nations Institute
 


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