Asserting Self-Governing Authority Beyond the Federal Recognition Paradigm: North Carolina’s Adaptation of the Indian Child Welfare Act

Citation

Hiraldo, Danielle. 2018. Asserting Self-Governing Authority Beyond the Federal Recognition Paradigm: North Carolina’s Adaptation of the Indian Child Welfare Act. Chapter for Indigenous Justice: Crime and Social Justice. Eds. Karen Jarratt-Snider and Marianne O. Nielsen. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press.

Across the united states, federally recognized tribes have been engaging in assertions of sovereignty and varying degrees of institution building associated with Native nation rebuilding. Jorgensen (2007) articulates the Native nation rebuilding principles as assertion of self-rule, capable governing institutions, culture match, strategic orientation, and public-spirited leadership. Much of the nation-building literature in the United States documents the successful strategies many federally recognized tribes use to build healthy and sustainable communities according to their own needs. These Indigenous self-government discussions often overlook state-recognized tribes.

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