Native Nations and U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security

Citation

Starks, Rachel Rose, Jen McCormack, and Stephen Cornell. 2011. Native Nations and U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security. Tucson: Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, The University of Arizona.

Authored by Rachel Rose Starks, Jen McCormack, and Stephan Cornell, Native Nations and U.S. Borders offers an informative review of the effects of border policy on indigenous Nations of North America. Consistent with the other publications of the Native Nations Institute, this book serves as an important resource for indigenous leaders, as well as government agencies and policy-makers, who find themselves responsible for the security of border regions. Since the events of 11 September 2001, the security of border regions has become the focus of US border policy, and is an issue of intense political polarization in the USA. Yet, these sites of security and political contestation are also the homeland to over 70 indigenous Nations whose territorial lands span the border regions between the USA, Mexico, and Canada. Native Nations and U.S. Borders provides an overview of the historical and contemporary effects of international borders on these indigenous Nations, and reviews some of the strategies used by indigenous Nations to respond to the border-related challenges they now face.

Available for purchase and a preview of the book.

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